Understanding Statement Coverage in Software Testing

Cover Image for Understanding Statement Coverage in Software Testing
Arindam Majumder
Table of Contents

Introduction

The software testing world widely utilizes statement coverage. It's a technique that ensures every line of code gets a test run, making the software strong and free of bugs.

In this article, we'll explore What is Statement Coverage, How it works, its benefits and many more!

Let's dive deep into it!

What is Statement Coverage?

Statement coverage is a white box testing technique where we try to execute all statements in the source code. It aims to execute every statement in the code at least once to achieve 100% statement coverage.

Using this test coverage technique, we calculate the percentage of statements in the source code executed during testing.

The Formula of that is:

*Statement coverage = (Executed statements / Total statements) * 100*
Statement coverage doesn't ensure complete testing of all functions, it measures the quantity of the tested statements

How it works?

woman using MacBook

So, Let's understand How it Works!

Firstly, We determine the total number of statements present in the code. This includes all executable statements like if conditions, loops, function calls, etc.

Next, We write test cases to execute as many statements as possible.

Then We run the test cases and determine the executed statements.

Lastly, Using the formula we calculate the Statement Coverage.

Example:

input (int a, int b)
{
int sum = a + b;
If (sum>0)
{
Print (This is the positive result);
}
else
{
Print (This is the negative result);
}
}

For this example we'll take two Cases:

  • One for the Positive Result
  • another for the negative result.

Case 1:

In the case of a positive result, let's consider both a and b as positive, where a equals 3 and b equals 5.

Since the sum is positive (greater than zero), It will execute the if block, and skip the else block.

Total statements: 5

Executed statements: 3

Statement coverage = (3/5) * 100 = 60%
Case 2:

In the case of a negative result, let's consider both a and b as negative, where a equals -3 and b equals -5.

Now, the sum will be negative and unlike the previous one, it will execute the else block and skip the if block.

Total statements: 5

Executed statements: 4

Statement coverage = (4/5) * 100 = 80%
Total :

To attain a comprehensive test coverage of 100 %, we aim to utilize code with different input values that execute all possible pathways. This approach guarantees that our system undergoes rigorous evaluation and that any possible issues are promptly identified and resolved.

Total statements: 5

Executed statements: 5

Statement coverage = (5/5) * 100 = 100%
With these two test cases, we have executed every statement at least once!

Importance in Software Testing:

shallow focus photo of person using MacBook

Now that we have a basic understanding of what is Statement Coverage and How it works! you might be pondering, Why should I even care about this? What's its significance?

So Let's see the benefits of this type of test coverage:

  • It helps us to find untested statements.
  • It acts as an initial metric of the thoroughness of testing.
  • By analyzing the execution of statements, it can identify unused code to remove.
  • Statement coverage is quick to implement.

Conclusion:

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Thank you for Reading 🙂

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Author

Taggedbackend-developmentskeploysoftware-developmentstatement-testingtesting


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